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Native Flute Glossary

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
Altiplano The widest part of the Andes mountain chain, in South America.
Amazon Both a river and a region in South America.
American Indian A term sometimes used interchangeably with Native American to describe the early inhabitants of the United States.
Ancestral Pueblo Flute A name some Indigenous Flutemakers would prefer that the Anasazi Flute be called.
Anasazi A name applied by archaeologists to Ancestral Indigenous Peoples inhabiting the four corners region of the American Southwest roughly corresponding to the years 850 AD - 1300 AD.
Anasazi Flute One of the main flutes of the American Southwest with origins dating back to at least 700 AD.
Andes Three chains of mountain ranges which span much of South America from north to south.
Antara A type of panpipe, hailing from Peru.
Arka The portion of tubes on a Siku panpipe which are thought of as female.
Aymara The Indigenous language spoken by the Aymara Peoples of Peru, Bolivia and Chile.
 
B
Bird A term applied to an external component, mounted on Plains and Woodlands flute, often in the shape of an animal or other figure.
Bisel The notch in the mouthpiece of a Quena flute.
Block A term applied to an external component, mounted on Plains and Woodlands flute, often in the shape of an animal or other figure.
 
C
Central America A region of the America which includes Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama.
Chaco Canyon A major civilization site in New Mexico, inhabited by Ancestral Puebloan Peoples.
Charango A small, mandolin-like string instrument used in Andean music to accompany Andean flutes.
Chulli One of the smallest sizes of Andean Panflutes, also called the Ika.
 
D
Doc Tate Nevaquaya A Comanche artist credited with reawakening interest in the Plains Flute in the mid 20th century.
 
E
Eastern Woodlands A geographic term comprising the portion of the North America between Southeastern Canada and the Southeastern United States.
 
F
Fetish A term applied to an external component, mounted on Plains and Woodlands flute, often in the shape of an animal or other figure.
First Nations A term applied to the major group of Indigenous Canadian Peoples.
Fipple The sharp edge of many Native Flutes which splits the puff of air and produces sound.
 
G
Guoman Poma (Waman Puma) The Indigenous chronicler of Inca life who wrote the 1,189 page document, Nueva Corónica y Buen Gobierno
 
H
Hopewell Tradition A term applied by archaeologists to diverse cultures centered on the Ohio River Valley between 200 BC - 500 AD.
 
I
Ika One of the smallest Andean panflutes, also called the Chulli.
Indigenous A term applied to early inhabitants of the American Continents.
Inca (Inka) The ruling lords of Tawantinsuyu, a region spanning from Colombia to Chile, between 1442 AD - 1572.
Ira The portion of tubes on a Siku panpipe which are thought of as male.
 
J
Jach'a One of the larger Andean panflutes.
 
K
Kena An alternative spelling for the Quena Flute of South America.
 
L
Llama A camelid indigenous to South America, the bones of which were sometimes used in early flutemaking.
 
M
Malta A medium sized Andean panflute.
Mesoamerica A region of the American Continents stretching from central Mexico to Honduras and Nicaragua.
Moche A term applied to a South American culture corresponding to the dates 100 AD - 800 AD.
Muesca The notch in the mouthpiece of the Quena Flute.
 
N
Nasca A term applied to a South American culture corresponding to the dates 1,100 BC - 750 AD.
North America A geographic region comprising the United States, Canada and Mexico.
 
O
Ocarina A small vessel flute with a history on the American Continents that dates back to at least 2000 BC.
 
P
Panflute A term interchangeable with Panpipes, used to describe a multi-tubed wind instrument.
Panpipes The English word for a multi-tubed flute, many versions of which exist on the American Continents.
Paracas A term applied to a South American culture corresponding to the dates 600 BC - 175 BC.
Plains Flute Often simply called the Native American Flute, the Plains Flute originates in the Great Plains of North America, with the modern-two-chambered-duct-flute dating to the early 1800s.
 
Q
Quechua An Indigenous language spoken primarily in the Andes of South America.
Quena A flute with a notched mouthpiece, native to the Andes of South America.
 
R
R. Carlos Nakai Considered one of the world's premier Native American Flute players.
Rondador The national panflute of Ecuador.
 
S
Sanka One of the lower toned Andean Panpipes. Also called 'Zanca'.
Siku The native panpipes of the Andes.
 
T
Tone holes The holes of a flute which are opened and closed by the fingers of the player, altering tone.
Toyo One of the largest Andean panflutes.
 

U

 

V

 
W
Wind Instrument A musical instrument through which sound is created by the blowing of air.
Woodlands Flute A two-chambered-duct-flute, originating in the Eastern Woodlands region of the United States, the modern version of which dates to the early 1800s.
Woodwind A musical instrument which produces sound when the player blows air against a sharp edge or through a reed.
 

X

 

Y

 
Z
Zampoña The Spanish word applied to the Andean Panflute.